Census 2020: Roswell Counts

 Until Census Day 2020
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Overview

Roswell Counts 2020 The City of Roswell wants YOU to be counted in the 2020 Census. Responding to the census helps Roswell get its fair share in the more than $675 billion in federal funds spent on roads, public works, hospitals, schools and more.

Local governments use the census for public safety and emergency preparedness. Census data are also used to determine legislative representation. Businesses use census data to decide where to build factories, offices and stores, and this creates jobs. Developers use the census to build new homes and revitalize old neighborhoods. Residents use the census to support community initiatives involving legislation, quality-of-life and consumer advocacy. The Census impacts you and everything around you.

So, make sure YOU are counted in Census 2020.
 



Census 101: What You Need to Know

The 2020 Census is closer than you think!
Here's a quick refresher of what it is and why it's essential that everyone is counted.
 
Everyone counts.
family
The census counts every person living in the U.S. once, only once, and in the right place.
 
It's in the constitution.
book
The U.S. Constitution mandates that everyone in the country be counted every 10 years. The first census was in 1790.
 
It's about fair representation.
government
Every 10 years, the results of the census are used to reapportion the House of Representatives, determining how many seats each state gets.
 
It's about redistricting.
redistricting
After each decade's census, state officials redraw the boundaries of the congressional and state legislative districts in their states to account for population shifts.
 
It's about $675 billion.
money
The distribution of more than $675 billion in federal funds, grants and support to states, counties and communities are based on census data. That money is spent on schools, hospitals, roads, public works and other vital programs.
 
Taking part is your civic duty.
Completing the census is mandatory: it's a way to participate in our democracy and say "I COUNT!"
hands
 
Census data are being used all around you.
people
Residents use the census to support community initiatives involving legislation, quality-of-life and consumer advocacy.
 
business
Businesses use census data to decide where to build factories, offices and stores, which create jobs.
 
government




Local governments use the census for public safety and emergency preparedness.
 
house
Real estate developers use the census to build new homes and revitalize old neighborhoods.
 
Your privacy is protected.
lock and key
It's against the law for the Census Bureau to publicly release your responses in any way that could identify you or your household.

By law, your responses cannot be used against you and can only be used to produce statistics.

Find out more about confidentiality at www.census.gov.



 
You can help.
pen
You are the expert—we need your ideas on the best way to make sure everyone in your community gets counted.

Find out how to help at www.census.gov.



 
2020 will be easier than ever.
computer
In 2020, you will be able to respond to the census online.

Find out more at www.census.gov.
 



Ways to Be Counted: Inviting Everyone to Respond

Every household will have the option of responding online, by mail, or by phone.
Nearly every householdwill receive an invitation to participate in the 2020 Census from either a postal worker or a census worker.
 
95%
 of households will receive their census invitation in the mail.
Census Household Map
 
Almost 5%
 of households will receive their census invitation when a census taker drops it off. In these areas, the majority of households may not receive mail at their home’s physical location (like households that use PO boxes or areas recently affected by natural disasters).
 
Less than 1%
 of households will be counted in person by a census taker, instead of being invited to respond on their own. We do this in very remote areas like parts of northern Maine, remote Alaska, and in select American Indian areas that ask to be counted in person.
 
Note: We have special procedures to count people who don’t live in households, such as students living in university housing or people experiencing homelessness.


What to Expect in the Mail
When it's time to respond, most households will receive an invitation in the mail. Every household will have the option of responding online, by mail, or by phone.

Depending on how likely your area is to respond online, you’ll receive either an invitation encouraging you to respond online or an invitation along with a paper questionnaire.
Letter Invitation
  • Most areas of the country are likely to respond online, so most households will receive a letter asking you to go online to complete the census questionnaire.
  • We plan on working with the U.S. Postal Service to stagger the delivery of these invitations over several days. This way we can spread out the number of users responding online, and we’ll be able to serve you better if you need help over the phone.
 
Letter Invitation and Paper Questionnaire
  • Areas that are less likely to respond online will receive a paper questionnaire along with their invitation. The invitation will also include information about how to respond online or by phone.
 



Important Dates

On or between You'll receive:
March 12–20, 2020 An invitation to respond online to the 2020 Census. (Some households will also receive paper questionnaires.)
March 16-24, 2020 A reminder letter.
If you haven't responded yet:
March 26 - April 3, 2020 A reminder postcard.
April 8-16, 2020 A reminder letter and paper questionnaire.
April 20-27, 2020 A final reminder postcard before we follow up in person.
 
We understand you might miss our initial letter in the mail.
  • Every household that hasn’t already responded will receive reminders and will eventually receive a paper questionnaire.
  • It doesn't matter which initial invitation you get or how you get it—we will follow up in person with all households that don't respond.