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Historic Gateway Project

Historic Gateway Project Rendering
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Roswell Transportation
Phone: 770-594-6420
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38 Hill Street
Suite 235
Roswell, GA 30075

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8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Historic Gateway/South Atlanta Street (Hwy 9)

The stretch of State Route 9/South Atlanta Street that runs between SR 120 (Marietta Hwy.) and the bridge over the Chattahoochee River has been the City of Roswell's #1 priority for transportation investment for almost a decade.

Also known as the "reversible lanes" and the "Historic Gateway," the City of Roswell and the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) have been working for several years to fix dangerous conditions on this road, which is among the top corridors for crashes in the Atlanta region.

The approved concept of this road involves removing the reversible lanes and constructing a four-lane street that will accommodate all users.

The project will feature:
  • Two permanent lanes in both directions
  • Safe access for pedestrians and cyclists, including multi-use trails, sidewalks, and dedicated pedestrian crossings (find out more)

  • Raised medians
  • Planting strips for more than 200 trees to help restore and enhance the existing tree canopy (find out more)
The design of the Historic Gateway project was approved by City Council in 2012. All the work that has been conducted since 2012, including environmental studies and right-of-way acquisition, has been based on the approved design. Right-of-way acquisition by the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) began in April 2018 and is currently ongoing (as of October 2019).

Any major changes to the project design would alter right-of-way acquisition and would cause significant delay (multiple years) and potentially jeopardize the project.

Small adjustments to the project within the footprint of the approved design that do not affect right-of-way acquisition may be considered.



 



Historic Gateway Project Tour
Slider Example
Below you will find eight renderings designed to give residents a better understanding of what the project will look like when it is complete.

Roswell Transportation worked with the City's TSPLOST Program Management team (Atkins) to complete them.

Renderings were shared with our Mayor and Council in late September 2019.
Slider Example

 

Project Overview Key Map




Location 1: New Roundabout on Riverside Rd.


View: From Riverside Park looking west toward SR 9
This artist rendering is conceptual in nature and subject to change. This rendering is based on the engineering design of September 2019.

Location 1 - Project Highlights:

  • Single-lane roundabout will accommodate all turning movements that currently occur at the intersection of SR 9 at Riverside Rd./Azalea Dr.
  • Roundabout also provides for safer turns out of side streets and safe pedestrian crossings.
  • Riverside Rd./Azalea Dr. corridor traffic doesn't have to stop as it goes under SR 9.
  • The land on three corners of the intersection of SR 9 at Riverside Rd./Azalea Dr. is not impacted.
  • Continuous bicycle/pedestrian connections to SR 9, boardwalk trail and hiking trails within National Park Service.
  • National Park Service entrance relocated from Riverside Road to Allenbrook.



Location 2: SR 9 at Azalea Dr.


View: From Sandy Springs looking north towards Roswell
This artist rendering is conceptual in nature and subject to change. This rendering is based on the engineering design of September 2019.

Location 2 - Project Highlights:

  • Grade separation at SR 9 intersection with Azalea Dr./Riverside Rd.
  • T-intersection signals (3-legged signals) are much more efficient than 4-legged signals, resulting in more green time for all movements.
  • Users of Azalea Dr./Riverside Rd. no longer have a traffic signal at SR 9.
  • Ivy Mill Ruins (National Park Service archaeological site) are preserved.
  • Historic Gateway multi-use trail ties into Chattahoochee River Pedestrian Bridge



Location 3: Azalea Dr.


View: Looking East towards Riverside Park
This artist rendering is conceptual in nature and subject to change. This rendering is based on the engineering design of September 2019.

Location 3 - Project Highlights:

  • Grade separation at SR 9 intersection with Azalea Dr./Riverside Rd.
  • T-intersection signals (3-legged signals) are much more efficient than 4-legged signals, resulting in more green time for all movements.
  • Continuous bicycle lanes along Azalea/Riverside underneath SR 9.



Location 4: SR 9 at Chattahoochee Cir.


View: Looking North to Historic Roswell
This artist rendering is conceptual in nature and subject to change. This rendering is based on the engineering design of September 2019.

Location 4 - Project Highlights:

  • National Park Service on the right.
  • New pedestrian crossing with Rectangle Rapid Flashing Beacon (RRFB) for MARTA bus stop.
  • Dedicated left turn into Avia Apartments and River Mill Condominiums.
  • Continuous multi-use trail from Historic Square to Chattahoochee River that connects all bus stops on the east side of SR 9 to pedestrian crossings, then continues into future pedestrian bridge over Chattahoochee River.
  • Large trees in center median along SR 9 to create tree canopy.



Location 5: SR 9 at Warm Springs Cir.


View: Looking South Towards National Park Service Property
This artist rendering is conceptual in nature and subject to change. This rendering is based on the engineering design of September 2019.

Location 5 - Project Highlights:

  • Continuous multi-use trail from Historic Square to Chattahoochee River
  • Street trees along the outside shoulder from Warm Springs Circle to the Historic Square
  • Narrow travel lanes
  • Pedestrian lighting



Location 6: New Roundabout on SR 9 at Church St.


View: Looking North towards Barrington Hall and Historic Square
This artist rendering is conceptual in nature and subject to change. This rendering is based on the engineering design of September 2019.

Location 6 - Project Highlights:

  • New roundabout where the sharp curve exists (Atlanta Street Baptist Church) calms traffic speeds down and provides safe pedestrian crossings and safe turns out of side streets.
  • Continuous median between roundabouts provides safe turns from driveways and reduces property impacts.
  • Continuous multi-use trail from Historic Square to Chattahoochee River.



Location 7: New Roundabout on SR 9 at Chattahoochee St. & King St.


View: Looking North towards Barrington Hall and Historic Square
This artist rendering is conceptual in nature and subject to change. This rendering is based on the engineering design of September 2019.

Location 7 - Project Highlights:

  • New roundabout at Neel Reid Drive/Chattahoochee St/King St calms traffic speeds down and provides safe pedestrian crossings and safe turns out of side streets.
  • Continuous median between roundabouts provides safe turns from driveways and reduces property impacts.
  • Barrington Hall sidewalk and wall are preserved.
  • Continuous multi-use trail from Historic Square to Chattahoochee River.



Location 8: SR 9 at SR 120


View: Looking South Towards Barrington Hall
This artist rendering is conceptual in nature and subject to change. This rendering is based on the engineering design of September 2019.

Location 8 - Project Highlights:

  • Historic Square preserved.
  • Continuous multi-use trail from Historic Square to Chattahoochee River.
  • Barrington Hall sidewalk and wall are preserved.
  • Dual left turns from northbound SR 9 onto SR 120/Marietta Highway improve intersection safety and operations and reduce delay, encouraging drivers to use state roads (SR 9 and SR 120) instead of local roads.



Project Management, Milestones, Timeline

Project Milestones and Tentative Timeline: 2018-2023


All future dates are estimates and are subject to change if delays are encountered.

Date Description
April 17, 2018 RDOT and GDOT held a joint "property owner's notification" meeting where all 62 parcels effected by this project were given invitations to review the project plans and be heard on their issues
April 26, 2018 GDOT authorized right of way (ROW) acquisition to commence for this project
Fall/Winter 2020-2021 ROW acquisition complete
Spring/Summer 2022 Final Plan Review, Certification of right of way (ROW), environmental document update, final utility coordination, select contractor
Spring/Summer 2023 Project construction to commence
Winter 2025/Spring 2026 Project complete


As a state road, this project is being overseen by the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT). GDOT is responsible for acquiring all right-of-way and easements for the project and will be responsible for construction.

The City of Roswell is working in partnership with GDOT on the project and is responsible for its engineering phase, as well as enhancements—such as improved lighting and connections to the National Park Service—which are funded through the City's T-SPLOST (Transportation Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax). Find out more about T-SPLOST.

As of September 2019, GDOT is 12 months into right-of-way acquisition for this project and expects the acquisition to continue for another 12 to 16 months. Once GDOT finishes right-of-way acquisition and establishes construction funding, construction of the project will begin (estimated Spring/Summer 2023). The project is expected to take 24-36 months to build.
 



Project Highlights

Safety

This corridor has traditionally been among the top corridors for crashes in the region and has had double the GDOT statewide average for crashes. According to data from 2015 to 2018, the corridor experienced 698 crashes (23 head-on collisions), 181 injuries, and one fatality. Over a 20 year period, it has been the site of multiple fatalities. And based on data from 2007 to 2009, this corridor experienced a 247% higher crash rate and a 208% higher injury rate than statewide average.

The reversible display system is obsolete and an ongoing maintenance challenge. The system sometimes "goes dark" for hours at a time, creating a safety hazard and needing extensive repair work.




Operational Improvements

This corridor currently is currently operating at a Level-of-Service (LOS) Rating "F" (national rating scale A-F).

The commute operates poorly due to:
  • Extensive queuing
  • Lack of turn lanes
  • Stopped buses
To address these problems, the new project will include:
  • The removal of the reversible lanes.
  • A grade-separated intersection at Riverside/Azalea and SR9 with a new traffic signal at a T-intersection on SR9 and a roundabout on Riverside.
  • A design that will facilitate safer traffic flow.



Bike/Pedestrian Facilities

The existing corridor has poor bike and pedestrian facilities. Much of the infrastructure in public ROW is sub-standard including pieces of narrow sidewalk with utility poles in the middle, and there is no pedestrian crossing opportunity.

Area residents have been asking for pedestrian accommodation along and across SR 9 for decades. There are no crossing opportunities today between the MARTA bus stops and businesses/residents. The project as being designed provides pedestrian features along both sides of the corridor with multiple crossing opportunities.

The Historic Gateway project incorporates improved facilities for both:
  • New multi-use paths and sidewalks.
  • New trails into the National Park (Vickery Creek Unit)
  • Five crosswalks across Highway 9/South Atlanta Street
  • This project designed for all users, regardless of whether they are travelling as drivers, pedestrians, bicyclists, or public transportation riders.
The map below illustrates how the Historic Gateway project, the Chattahoochee Bike/Pedestrian Bridge, the existing Riverwalk trail system, and the National Park System hiking trails will all connect seamlessly once the Historic Gateway project is complete.

Bike/Pedestrian Trails and Connections Map

Trails and Connections Map

Download Full Resolution Map





Trees

The vision for this project is to have a tree-lined boulevard between the two traffic-calming roundabouts, creating the feel of a linear park, and providing a physical and aesthetic buffer for pedestrians on sidewalks.

The road includes raised medians and planting strips that will include more than 200 large-caliber urban canopy trees.




Narrow Lanes

The design incorporates 11-foot travel lanes, which is as narrow as is permitted by GDOT for this project. Narrow lanes promote slower speeds (as compared to wider lanes) while still providing enough of a buffer to accommodate comfortable driving and decrease the potential for side-swipe collisions.

The narrow footprint of the road minimizes impacts within the Historic District along the entire corridor and, along with the inclusion of the tree-lined boulevard design, preserves the aesthetic impact of this historically narrow corridor.

The proposed project is the narrowest footprint that GDOT will support while still achieving the city's goals of a tree-lined corridor and a consistent bicycle/pedestrian connection from the square to the river.




Community Involvement

Since the start of this project, the City of Roswell has tried to balance the needs of all of stakeholders along the corridor while still accommodating the purpose of the project.

Some highlights of community outreach include:
  • The creation of a Citizens Advisory Group, which met multiple times in 2011-2012 to help create the current concept. This group included residents, business owners and other stakeholders from Roswell's Historic District.
  • 18 public information and community outreach meetings held 2011-2012.
  • The Historic Gateway project was also presented during the T-SPLOST community education campaign in 2016, during which more than 30 staff presentations were given to the community.
  • Multiple site visits and stakeholder meetings as requested.
  • A History Gateway Public Information Open House to recap and review the project to-date in January 2019.



Roundabouts

Multi-lane roundabouts have been included in the project to allow safe access to all commercial properties and allow the overall footprint of the road to be as narrow as possible.

The multi-lane roundabouts also include crosswalks to allow pedestrians to move safely from one side of SR 9 to the other, which is not present in the road's current condition.

The Federal Highway Administration has concluded after many years of research that "roundabouts reduce the types of crashes where people are seriously hurt or killed by 78-82 percent when compared to conventional stop-controlled and signalized intersections."

These safety benefits are intrinsic to the roundabout's basic design that reduces the number and severity of conflict points, and forces vehicles to interact with each other at slower speeds under a yield or merge condition.

Higher-speed right-angle collisions, one of the most potentially serious types of collisions, are almost entirely eliminated with a roundabout. Furthermore, roundabouts are an excellent choice to complement other transportation objectives, including multimodal mobility, context sensitivity, and corridor access management.

The primary reasons for the two roundabouts are crash reduction, speed control, and their ability to provide safe pedestrian crossings from one side of SR 9 to the other. If either roundabout were to be removed, the footprint of the proposed road would be increased at least 5-10' on each side of the road in order to provide turn lanes into the commercial areas. The roundabout pair narrows the footprint of the road, calms the traffic down and provides safe pedestrian crossing options.