T-SPLOST: Transportation-Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax
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Roswell Transportation
Phone: 770-594-6420
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38 Hill Street
Suite 235
Roswell, GA 30075

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8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
T-SPLOST: An Overview
On November 8, 2016, Fulton County voters approved the Transportation Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (T-SPLOST) referendum to fund transportation projects in their cities. In the City of Roswell, the measure passed 53.75% to 46.25%. Countywide the measure passed 52.80% to 47.20%. T-SPLOST will bring in an estimated $93 million to the City of Roswell for transportation improvements. In April 2017, a 0.75% (3/4 of a cent) sales tax went into effect to fund transportation projects specifically recommended by each Fulton County city.

Learn more about the new sales tax in the Georgia Department of Revenue's Policy Bulletin.


Find Out More
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About T-SPLOST
What is T-SPLOST?
T-SPLOST stands for Transportation Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax.

Simply put, it's a sales tax that is paid on taxable goods and services in Fulton County. All funds received would be used specifically for transportation improvements throughout Fulton County.

The sales tax would be in place for 5 years.

TSPLOST Logo
Why do we need it?
Fulton County residents identified transportation and congestion relief as the single most important issue facing Metro Atlanta.

2015 Metro Atlanta Speaks survey by Atlanta Regional Commission

Transportation Graphic
Who is involved?
Fulton County, including 13 cities (outside of the City of Atlanta) and unincorporated Fulton County.

Fulton County
How much will it cost?
The Fulton County T-SPLOST proposal is for a 0.75% sales tax, or 3/4 of a penny.

It is estimated that up to $655 million could be raised for the participating cities and unincorporated Fulton County, outside the City of Atlanta.

Penny
Who will pay the sales tax?
The sales tax will be paid by anyone who buys taxable products or services in Fulton County, outside of City of Atlanta limits.

This includes tourists, visitors, businesses and residents.

People
How will this benefit Roswell?
The City of Roswell's estimated share is $93 million.

This money would first be used on priority projects like Big Creek Parkway, the Historic Gateway Project, and other transportation projects our residents identified as important.

Road Work Sign
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T-SPLOST Projects
Click on the project name below to see a project overview for each project or explore our Interactive T-SPLOST Project Map.

Project Brief Description Tier Total Est. Cost (millions) Est. Roswell Share (millions)
ROS-001: Big Creek Parkway Phase 1 and 2 Construction of a new alignment roadway from Old Alabama Road to Warsaw Road. Includes a bridge over SR400, a bridge over Big Creek, and improvements to Old Holcomb Bridge Road (20% Contingency). I $58.5 $58.5
ROS-014: Holcomb Bridge Interchange (Design Only) Design and partial funding for ROW (right of way) and construction for projects from the Holcomb Bridge Road Corridor Study, possibly including reconstruction of the bridges over SR 400 and other projects in coordination with GDOT. (20% Contingency) I $6 $6
ROS-002: Historic Gateway Enhancements Enhancements to reconstruction of SR 9 from the Chattahoochee River north to Historic Roswell, such as underground utilities, improved lighting, connections to the National Park Service, and design costs for the enhancements. (0% Contingency)
Sandy Springs is proposing to help fund with a portion of their TSPLOST list. The majority of funding for this project is anticipated to come from State and Federal funds.
I $24 $3
ROS-016: Rucker Road Reconstruction Reconstruction of Rucker Road from Alpharetta City Limits to Arnold Mill Road/Houze Road Intersection.
This is a joint project with Alpharetta. (20% Contingency)
I $15.8 $1.5
ROS-010: Oxbo Road/SR9 Intersection Redesign of the intersection of Oxbo Road and SR 9 creating a full intersection and at SR 9 south of the existing intersection. The project also includes linking of Pleasant Hill and Elm Streets. (20% Contingency) I $7 $7
ROS-009: Old Holcomb Bridge Road Replacement This project is the replacement of weight-restricted bridge on Old Holcomb Bridge Road bridge over Big Creek. (20% Contingency) I $3,086,390 $3,086,390
ROS-012: Sidewalk Repair and Complete Streets Program General sidewalk repair and gap filling based on the sidewalk prioritization inventory conducted in 2015. Priorities include connecting residential, commercial, and civic uses and completing gaps in heavily traveled areas. Where applicable, also includes construction of complete streets along corridors of the Roswell Loop. II $7.0 $7.0
ROS-015: Safety Improvements and Maintenance General safety and maintenance projects, such as replacement of obsolete guardrails, replacement of weight-restricted bridges (i.e. Willeo Road), minor intersection improvements, and road resurfacing and rehabilitation. II $6,956,422 $6,956,422
ROS-013: Intersection and Corridor Improvements General intersection and corridor improvements, including geometric redesign, reconstruction of corridors as complete streets, mini-roundabouts and full roundabouts. Specific corridors under consideration include but are not limited to Nesbit Ferry Road, enhancements to Old Alabama Road (in conjunction with GDOT), and the Myrtle Street extension. III $14,011,490 $14,011,490
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Historic Gateway Enhancements Project
Project Facts
  • This corridor has been the City's #1 priority for transportation investment since the project was restarted in 2009.

  • Atlanta Street Baptist Church has known about this project and the associated impacts since a Public Meeting was held at the Church on September 22, 2011.

  • Staff has also met several times with Pastor Caldwell and members of the church to give them an update on the status of this project (August 22, 2011 and March 27, 2015).

  • As always, the City will balance the needs of all of the stakeholders along the corridor that are being impacted while still accommodating the purpose of the project. Minor revisions to the project are expected to occur during the right of way acquisition phase.

  • The City created a Citizens Advisory Group that met multiple times in 2011-2012 to help create the current concept to remove the reversible lanes. This group was comprised of residents, business owners and other stakeholders from Roswell's Historic District.

  • The purpose of the project is remove the reversible lanes along SR 9/Atlanta Street between SR 120 and the bridge over the Chattahoochee River and replace them with a 4-lane complete street that serves local traffic, commuter traffic, bicycles, pedestrians and transit users in a safe manner. The typical section was approved by Roswell's Mayor and Council on August 29, 2012. Multi-lane roundabouts have been included in the project to allow safe access to all commercial properties and allow the overall footprint of the road to be as narrow as possible. The multi-lane roundabouts also include crosswalks to allow pedestrians to move safely from one side of SR 9 to the other, which is not allowed in the present configuration. The narrow footprint of the road minimizes impacts within the Historic District along the entire corridor.

  • The average number of crashes that occur in this corridor per year is 137. The average number of crashes involving injuries per year is 27. There have been multiple fatalities in this corridor over a 20-year period.

  • While this is a state road and not a city road, the City of Roswell is working in conjunction with Georgia DOT on the project and is responsible for its engineering phase. Georgia DOT is responsible for acquiring all right-of-way and easements for the project and will be responsible for construction. Georgia DOT is in the beginning stages or Right of way acquisition, which is expected to take 24 months. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2021 provided adequate state funding.

Project Milestones: 2018-2023

Date Description
April 17, 2018 RDOT and GDOT held a joint "property owner's notification" meeting where all 62 parcels effected by this project were given invitations to review the project plans and be heard on their issues
April 26, 2018 GDOT authorized right of way (ROW) acquisition to commence for this project
Summer 2018 Final project design underway
Summer 2020 ROW acquisition complete
Fall/Winter 2020-2021 Final Plan Review, Certification of ROW, Refresh of environmental document, final utility coordination, select contractor
Spring 2021 Project construction to commence
Summer/Fall 2023 Project complete


Related Documents
 
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Transportation Update Video Series
About the Transportation Update Video Series
Through our new Transportation Update video series, we'll let you know where we are in the process of a variety of Transportation Projects, what milestones we're celebrating, and even what challenges we might be facing. So, click play and fasten your seatbelts. Here we go!



Episode I
T-SPLOST: Where Are We Now?
October 13, 2017
In our first episode, Transportation Director Steve Acenbrak reminds us what T-SPLOST is and explains that the City has started receiving monthly T-SPLOST collections, which are being put into a special account for the approved construction projects. Steve explains that while those funds are building up, there's a lot going on behind the scenes to prepare for upcoming projects. He takes us to a construction site to show us the complex process that goes into all transportation projects and then visits the future site of Big Creek Parkway, our largest upcoming T-SPLOST project.

 

Episode II
Hardscrabble Green Loop
March 27, 2018
The City of Roswell is starting work to transform Hardscrabble Road into a "complete street" that will be as functional and safe for pedestrians and bicyclists as it will be for vehicles.